Economy and Ventriloquist Figure Prices

I hate to say it but unfortunately our politicians on both sides of the isle just have no clue as to how we the regular folk are fairing in these economic times. We keep hearing from them that we have left the recession behind and are doing fine. Housing prices climbing yadda yadda yadda. I just wish they really opened their eyes. The economists, who also earn 6 figure incomes, just have no clue.

This brings me to the topic of the blog. Prices on Ventriloquist figures have not changed much over the past five years. Especially on the secondary market. You really have to think hard about trying to re coupe a full price on a figure if the maker is still producing same.

Folks would much rather purchase a brand new figure for the price that some ask for a used figure. Vent figures are much like automobiles. When you buy new and drive the car off the showroom floor you lose thousands. Value on a new vent figure does the same.

So in a nut shell you need to “sale” price your figure to sell it. This is sound advice and the proof of this have been seen on the Ventriloquist Marketplace. Figures that are listed there with prices that are correct, sell extremely fast. If they are priced too high they sit.

Antique ventriloquist figures are exempted from this discussion.

Dan
www.ventriloquistcentral.com

Have you seen the Frank Marshall Tribute DVD, click here

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Ventriloquist Central is the brainchild of Dan Willinger and Steve Hurst. Dan is a ventriloquism enthusiast and ventriloquist figure collector. He has been collecting for over 25 years. He created the Ventriloquist Central Collection. It now has over 100 ventriloquist figures and over 50 of them are Frank Marshall figures. Steve is a ventriloquist as well as builder of ventriloquist figures. He also has a background in sales, marketing, building websites and computers. Because they both love the art of ventriloquism, the website Ventriloquist Central was born. For more information about the website, go to: http://www.ventriloquistcentral.com

Copyright 2014 by Dan Willinger and Steve Hurst

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3 Responses to Economy and Ventriloquist Figure Prices

  1. Matt Kimbro says:

    Dan, you are exactly right. This is currently a buyer’s market for all types of collectibles!

  2. While a figure might have sentimental value to you, and as such you price it according to that, however, to another person it’s simply another figure.

  3. David Boiano says:

    You’re right Dan, that’s why people need to really think more about buying a figure, especially higher dollar figures. We all see it regularly, someone buys a figure and not all that much longer after buying it, they have it up for sale, and though they may start out trying to recoup what they paid, they end up having to drop the price and take a loss.
    Better to make sure the figure you’re buying is one that will work for you, as has been said many times from many sources, develop the character first, then find a figure that fits that character, rather than buying a figure and hoping you create a character with it.

    The other part of it, is what Matt said, it is, and has been for some time, a buyer’s market, and I really don’t see it swinging back the other way.
    For a long time it was a seller’s market, but then figure-makers were relatively few, and if you wanted to make your own figure, info was extremely hard to get. But then figure making info became abundantly available and the number of people making figures seem to explode, creating a bit of a glut on what is a relatively limited market. So then it becomes a matter of the old “supply and demand” dictates what something can sell for.

    Of course, as you say Dan, this doesn’t apply to antique figures, although I have no doubt the economy has affected that somewhat as well.

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